Nourriture et énergie : posséder et utiliser les moyens de production

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Aller en bas

Nourriture et énergie : posséder et utiliser les moyens de production

Message par Canis Lupus le Ven 12 Mar 2010 - 14:06

Chers amis survivalistes,

Je viens de lire sur Survivalblog.com un article qui m'a beaucoup plus. L'auteur motive les preppers à devenir propriétaire de moyens de production de leur nourriture et de leur énergie : fôrets, pâtures, jardins.
C'est simplement un retour à la campagne, mais dans une optique autonomiste affirmée, pas seulement pour être loin du troupeau et respirer de l'air frais tout en utilisant l'électricité nucléaire pour chauffer son eau/nourriture/maison.

J'essaie de me diriger vers ce genre de mode de vie, où idéalement je produirais une grande partie de ma nourriture végétarienne (+ du gibier le cas échéant), et j'obtiendrais l'énergie nécessaire pour m'éclairer et me chauffer dans mon environnement immédiat.

Je me permets de citer l'intégralité du message car c'est plein de sagesse survivaliste geek !

N'attendez pas d'être à poil devant le Loup à bêler comme un sheeple, préparez-vous !!

It is All About the Means of Production, by Mark. B.



From the beginning of time, ownership and control of quality farm land and raw materials have been closely associated with wealth creation and prosperity. What can you grow or raise? What resources and commodities do you own and control? How much metal, stone, glass, and wood do you own? Do you have the means, knowledge, tools and skills to produce valuable items from this land and these raw materials?

As America was settled, the pioneers knew very well the fundamentals of non-electric, independence away from the city and just how critical natural resources were to survival. If a parcel did not have fresh water and tillable flat bottom farm land, it was left alone and many years later those same lands are now national parks, national forests, and BLM lands owned by the government.

The primary questions in the minds of those early settlers should also be the same questions in the minds of today’s long-term prepper families. Those questions are simply, “Will this parcel of land support our life?”, and “Do I have ownership and control over the means of production of my food and fuel on this land”?

All along the Blue Ridge mountains, the real estate agents have a phrase they use concerning land value, that phrase is, “the steeper, the cheaper”. It is well known that when you see land advertised as “good hunting land”, that the property really will not support its residents. It is too rocky and hilly, and will not support decent crop production for man and livestock. It is only the last few generations of fearful city type suburbanites and armchair survivalists that have elevated the notion that mountain land remoteness equals security and that is the number one quality to look for in a “retreat”. But mountain living leaves much to be desired in security in many important areas and ways. Never be deluded into thinking that you are safe high up in the woods and that no one will know you are there. It bears reminding everyone of the biblical verse and truth:

Matt 5:14 “A city that is set on an hill cannot be hid”.

Caves and mountains are where you go to if you are on the run, and need temporary shelter from pursuit, just read the Bible and look at history. People only lived that way out of destitute desperation, because everything [needed to support life] must be hauled in on a continual basis in order to survive. Those locations are not an assured long term sustainable solution in many cases. The primary reason is that very little livestock feed can be produced. Be careful that your homestead location does not separate you from the critical means of production, and forever tether you to others for the things you should be producing yourself. If possible then always opt for sustainable systems capabilities in your land purchase decisions as the most important criteria. I encourage forward thinking preppers to expand their retreat and homestead plans to the realities of true societal and monetary system independence. Be willing to transition to an agrarian lifestyle now, and take control over all the means of production of two things in your life: food and fuel. Get to the place where you own the finished goods and things you cannot grow or raise each year such as salt, tools, and ammo. Owning a lifetime supply of salt is something that is not too difficult. You are trying to reach the point where a yearly cycle in food and fuel production is all you have to worry about. This gives you the freedom to stay out of the cities and towns for basic supplies others will be clamoring for; for a great many years. This starts not with the question of how remote is my land from society’s "zombies", but “will my land support life, and do I own all the means of production”? The litmus test is really drawn not at the backyard 4x4 square foot garden level, but rather: can I grow feed for my livestock and my family’s fuel production on this parcel? This is really what the means of production are all about.

It is ownership and control over the means of production of food and fuel that will ensure you and your family of long term survival in a TEOTWAWKI scenario.

Be willing to ask the questions of a pioneer settler with his family in a covered wagon in 1850. “Will this land support life”?, “Can I grow feed for my poultry flocks, dairy and meat animals, aquaculture ponds, and humans”? “Is there a surface fresh water source on this land”? “What about timber and material resources”? Do I have the tools, knowledge, skills, and finished goods for these systems and processes? These are the basics of life and questions that a century ago would have been common knowledge to all, but today’s modern city sheeple prepper wanna-bes too often overlook and discard. Just like we are spoiled with instant everything, we think of every shortcut possible to “instant survival”. At some point you must get to the place where your “retreat” becomes your “mini-farm”. Otherwise, you are simply camping with a can of food.

“Can I produce all my own fuel from this land?” is the second part of the means of production mindset. There are six primary farmstead fuels that wise people should all be in the process of utilizing for their energy independence. They are: wood, charcoal, methane, ethanol, producer gas, and beeswax. Study these fuels, learn all you can and purchase now all the means of production for them on your land. Do not look to the left or to the right. Turn the television off and spend your free time developing these systems and learning the skill sets needed for their production, storage, and use.

Many today will never voluntarily choose an agrarian lifestyle or pursue the ownership and control over the means of production. Instead they will rely solely on commercial packaged food and fuel produced by others who are wise enough to own the means of production. They must haul each load to their retreat, with no hope of new supplies while they keep their city office jobs and suburban comforts till they believe they will “bug out” and be "safe". Lord, help them all is all I can say.

While having the courage to pursue the ownership and control over the means of production instead of mere temporary “preps” is essential, the real challenge for First World urbanites is the shift in practicing and mastering the skills surrounding those means. It takes work and that is a four letter word when everyone wants to be a musician, artist, writer, or celebrity. Choose the agrarian/skills-based lifestyle now even with all the learning curves and mistakes you will make, before you are a fleeing refugee of this empire collapse, and can only wish you would have chosen this path and secured these means sooner. All of the suffering and sacrifice you endure now in becoming skilled and truly prepared, is nothing compared to all of the suffering and sacrifice you would endure later if you are not already skilled and prepared.

I'll close with two more Bible verses:

“Wise men lay up knowledge.” (Prov. 10:14)

“Fools despise wisdom and instruction” (Prov. 1:7)

________________________________________________________


¤  "Rien ne sert de courrir, il faut partir à point." - La Fontaine  ¤  Très cher BOB ...  ¤  "An ounce of action is worth a ton of theory."¤

Canis Lupus
Membre fondateur

Masculin Nombre de messages : 3693
Age : 31
Date d'inscription : 16/11/2006

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://fullspectrumpreparedness.blogspot.com/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Nourriture et énergie : posséder et utiliser les moyens de production

Message par Barnabé le Lun 15 Mar 2010 - 21:15

Salut,

ce texte est intéressant, mais je vois une grosse, grosse erreur dans le raisonnement. Aucune réflexion ne porte sur : "de quelle énergie j'ai vraiment besoin pour vivre ?"

Les américains actuels sont des junkies de l'énergie : 7,75 tep/habitant/an (converti tel quel : environ 9000 litres de fioul/habitant/an). La nourriture est aussi un concentré d'énergie fossile, avec en moyenne 10 unités d'énergie utilisées pour produire une unité d'énergie digérable.

Dans ce contexte, les références à la bible ou aux pionniers de 1850 sont une supercherie intellectuelle, si on ne dit pas aussi : "les gens à cette époque pouvaient maîtriser leurs production d'énergie et de nourriture car ils avaient des besoins très frugaux". C'est une supercherie intellectuelle si on ne poursuit pas la réflexion "pensez-vous pouvoir vivre comme au temps de la bible ? Etes-vous capables de vous passer de l'électricité, de votre voiture, d'un tracteur, de l'outillage électroportatif, des engrais chimiques, etc ? ".

Un des trucs flagrants avec les survivalistes et les preppers américains, c'est à quel point leurs préparations visent à maintenir leur mode de vie actuel. Comme disait George W. Bush "le mode de vie américain est non négociable". Or, il est totalement irréaliste de vouloir maintenir la consommation énérgétique actuelle dans un scénario "back to the land".

Poser la question de la maîtrise de la production de nourriture et d'énergie, sans dire aussi "quelle est vraiment la quantité d'énergie dont j'ai besoin, et suis-je prêt à faire le chemin de la sobriété énergétique ?", c'est seulement la moitié du boulot. Et dans ce domaine, la moitié du boulot, c'est pas de boulot du tout (surtout pour un américain), car on ne peut pas laisser des questions d'une telle importance non abordées, et prétendre quand même être prêt !

Si on dit, comme George W Bush, que notre mode de vie est "non négociable", et qu'on reconnaît qu'on aura beaucoup de mal à produire le carburant pour son 4x4 et son tracteur et son électricité pour tous les usages superflus, et cela pour la durée du restant de sa vie, autant être honnête avec soi même, reconnaître qu'on ne pourra que très très difficilement être autonome en énergie, et alors il faut enterrer dans le jardin deux énormes cuves, une d'essence, une de fioul ! Alors seulement, oui, on a une préparation cohérente, et on maîtrise ses sources d'énergie, même si on est aussi pollueur, non producteur et non sustainable. Mais il faut bien visualiser qu'à 9000 l de fioul/hab/an (dans l'hypothèse très schématique où l'américain moyen voudrait assurer tous les besoins énergétiques à partir du fioul), il faudrait une cuve de 720 000 litres de fioul pour une famille de 4 personnes pendant 20 ans. Au tarif français du fioul, il faudrait 482 000 euros pour la remplir, sans parler du coût de construction et du fait que ce stockage serait illégal. Bien sûr ce calcul est faux et schématique, car une partie de l'énergie ramenée par tête de pipe sert à des activités (industrielles etc.) qui s'arrêteraient ou connaîtraient un fort ralentissement dans un tel scénario.

Ce petit calcul montre quand même que, vu les volumes et les coûts impliqués, on va peut-être se retrouver obligés de se convertir à la frugalité énergétique. Quelle horreur !

On retrouve ce côté energy junkie dans son assertion :
"There are six primary farmstead fuels that wise people should all be in the process of utilizing for their energy independence. They are: wood, charcoal, methane, ethanol, producer gas, and beeswax. Study these fuels, learn all you can and purchase now all the means of production for them on your land. Do not look to the left or to the right. Turn the television off and spend your free time developing these systems and learning the skill sets needed for their production, storage, and use"

Il faut vraiment produire 6 combustibles différents pour faire partie des "gens sages" : bois, charbon, méthane, alcool, gaz de gazogène, et cire d'abeille ? Dans un scénario TEOTWAKI, on aura vraiment le loisir de "cultiver" ces 6 combustibles ? A mon avis c'est n'importe quoi. A l'échelle d'une famille ou même d'un petit hameau, on n'aura pas le loisir de consacrer autant de temps et de technique à produire ces combustibles. La plupart des combustibles qu'il décrit est d'origine renouvelable, et pourtant ce sont des formes d'énergie que j'appelerais "noires", des formes concentrées, très faciles à utiliser (mais souvent difficiles à produire), des "esclaves énergétiques" similaires au charbon, pétrole et gaz actuels.

C'est sûr qu'un séchoir solaire ou une charrette à bras, c'est beaucoup moins sexy ! Et pourtant, c'est généralement beaucoup plus simple. Les formes "noires" qu'il cite sont difficiles à produire, voire même dangereuses (un gazogène, c'est complexe à construire, à faire fonctionner et à entretenir, et ça peut exploser et/ou intoxiquer son utilisateur). Le fait de mentionner comme priorité de maîtriser 6 combustibles concentrés, proches des combustibles fossiles actuels, faciles à utiliser mais difficile à produire, c'est une façon de repousser l'angoisse de TEOTWAKI, de s'ancrer au connu, et de s'accrocher à la fois à l'idéologie actuelle et à l'idéologie des pionniers américains (c'est à dire, un mode de vie fruste mais basé sur une nature qu'on peut exploiter à volonté).

Si on commence par se demander quelles énergies sont gratuites, quelles énergies sont facilement disponibles, et quelles énergies ont été utilisées par les hommes dans les époques préhistoriques puis au début de l'agriculture, on aboutira à des solutions beaucoup plus low-tech, beaucoup plus faciles à mettre en oeuvre. Quand on maîtrise cette première couche technologique, alors rien n'empêche de tâter de la méthanisation ou du gazogène. Mais il ne faudrait pas zapper directement tout l'aspect low-tech qui est le plus facile à mettre en oeuvre quand on a peu de moyens.

Il y a aussi une autre grosse erreur de raisonnement : si on est vraiment dans un scénario "back to the land because all else failed", tel que l'implique cet auteur, la terre arable, plane et irrigable, ainsi que la nourriture et l'énergie, ça sera le centre de toutes les convoitises. Pour avoir une production agricole, il faut du travail, de la patience et de la stabilité. Il est tellement facile de voler plutôt que de produire (= pillage)... ou, un peu plus honnête, de proposer la stabilité en échange de la nourriture (système féodal). Donc, si on n'a pas, en plus de la terre arable, prévu aussi des moyens énormes de défense collective à l'échelle d'un hameau, d'un village ou d'un canton, c'est cuit. Les américains prévoient de l'armement mais pas forcément de quoi tenir longtemps dans un scénario à la Mad Max. Il n'y a pas grand monde pour mener cette réflexion jusqu'au bout.
Personnellement, je crois que je préfererais survivre de chasse et de cueillette dans les montagnes pentues qu'il dénigre, plutôt que d'être la victime du pillage, ou encore me retrouver un des serfs du seigneur de guerre local, obligé de travailler 12 heures par jour avec la faim au ventre, sur mes propres terres arables, planes et irrigables autrefois payées avec mes sous ! M'enfin cette réflexion menant à des sujets hors charte, je ne m'étendrai pas sur ce second sujet !

Barnabé
Membre Premium

Masculin Nombre de messages : 5287
Localisation : Massif Central
Date d'inscription : 28/04/2008

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Re: Nourriture et énergie : posséder et utiliser les moyens de production

Message par volwest le Mar 31 Aoû 2010 - 19:35

Sujet intéressant.


"Un des trucs flagrants avec les survivalistes et les preppers américains, c'est à quel point leurs préparations visent à maintenir leur mode de vie actuel. Comme disait George W. Bush "le mode de vie américain est non négociable". Or, il est totalement irréaliste de vouloir maintenir la consommation énérgétique actuelle dans un scénario "back to the land"."


C'est justement parce que notre mode de vie est négociable, que ce texte et d'autres comme celui-ci fait vague sur les ondes.
La production de nourriture au niveau de l'individu est une révolution.
Mais cette révolution découle d'une certaine ambiance a l'échelle du pays, et n'est pas exclusivement adoptée par les preppers et les survivalistes.

Nous sommes bien d'accord que maintenir le mode de vie actuelle est l'opposé d'une démarche qui tend a l'autonomie. Surtout pour ce qui est de la nourriture.
C'est ici bien plus qu'une préparation soumise a l'anticipation d'un SHTF…et donc d'un univers survivaliste.

Devenir propriétaire et produire sa propre nourriture est en soi la négociation d'un mode de vie qui a pendant trop longtemps forcé le citoyen Américain a être dépendant d'un système souffrant de maux variées.

C'est la négociation face a des compagnies comme Monsanto.
Mais c'est aussi un désir de responsabilisation a un niveau individuel, régional et global.
Puisqu'il est question de négociation, elle inclus obligatoirement la consommation énergétique…
Un exemple de ce mouvement est la famille Dervaes…qui fait la une des journaux et des émissions de télévision, et qui pourtant n'est pas dans la vision du prepper ou du survivaliste.
Voici leur site : http://urbanhomestead.org/

Dans cette vision des choses, il est évident qu'un politicien comme Bush dise des bêtises, car il est concerné par cette révolution, qui verrait le gouvernement avoir de moins en moins de pouvoir sur les citoyens.
Imagine, si nous avions tous une terre, un moyen de se nourrir, et un moyen de se défendre.
Ce qui nous ramène bien a une époque, ou l'Européen ne pouvait posséder une terre et produire sa propre nourriture sans une taxe énorme et paralysante.
L'immigration vers l'Amérique de ces paysans, est aujourd'hui associé a un désir de se voir libre d'exprimer une religion de son choix, mais le fait est, que les premiers Européens était surtout motivés par la possession de la terre.

Cette motivation n'a jamais quittée le coeur du peuple Américain…et dans l'ambiance économique et politique actuelle, elle sonne encore plus vrai.



L'auteur cependant n'est pas a la page…comme beaucoup des articles sur survivalblog d'ailleurs, il y manque une vision plus adaptées et plus jeune telle que la permaculture par exemple, qui ne s'aligne pas avec une conception de la cultivation qui n'a pas vraiment de sens aujourd'hui.
Si l'auteur nous parle de mono-culture, d'une terre arable plane et irrigable, c'est qu'il n'est pas encore cohérent dans sa manière d'exprimer l'autonomie.

La permaculture est la réponse a toutes les questions valides que tu amènes quand a la défense et l'organisation.
Le fond de l'article reste cependant une proposition qui nous rends plus responsable et moins dépendant.

volwest
Membre Premium

Masculin Nombre de messages : 246
Localisation : Montana
Date d'inscription : 24/08/2010

Voir le profil de l'utilisateur http://lesurvivaliste.blogspot.com/

Revenir en haut Aller en bas

Voir le sujet précédent Voir le sujet suivant Revenir en haut

- Sujets similaires

 
Permission de ce forum:
Vous ne pouvez pas répondre aux sujets dans ce forum